A teenager from Crockenhill drove his father’s car without permission while he lay sleeping in bed

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A teenager from Crockenhill has been banned from driving for six months and ordered to pay almost £600 after taking his dad’s car without permission while he was asleep in bed.

Zac Aiano, of Daltons Road, was stopped by the police two weeks ago and found to have only a provisional licence as well as no insurance.

The 18-year-old admitted to the police he did not have his father’s consent after using the Ford Fiesta to go to Swanley just before 9pm on October 28.

Defending, Gurnam Mander, said Aiano, who works five days a week, deserved credit for owning up to his offences at the earliest opportunity.

On Tuesday (November 14) he told Sevenoaks Magistrates’ Court: “He was at home and his dad was asleep in bed when he decided to take the car out to buy some items.

“He had been driving for about five minutes and was stopped on his way back but he made a full admission to police.”

But chairman of the bench, Jeff Owen, said to Aiano “your thinking skills are not as good as they could be” and suggested he should speak to the Probation Service.

Disqualified

When he returned for the afternoon session, Aiano was told by Mr Owen his punishment would include a six-month community order focusing on decision making.

He said: “For taking the vehicle without consent we are going along with the Probation Service’s recommendation of a community order including 10 days of rehabilitation activity requirement.

“For not having insurance you will be fined £320 as well as six points on your licence and for driving otherwise in accordance with a licence, your licence will be endorsed and you will be given a £100 fine.

“Given the seven points you already had, you now have 13 points on your licence and will be disqualified from driving for six months from today.

“In addition you must pay a surcharge of £85 and must pay £85 towards the prosecution’s costs, giving a total of £590.”

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